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Are You Dressing for the Part?

By Rowe Leathers
Contributor, Career Services

Are you climbing the management ladder but still dressing like an intern? Are you a current manager who still dresses like the receptionist? While we dress to impress for the interview, we have a tendency to soften our standards following the probationary period. What begins as motivation to look professional, somewhere along the way, morphs into casual Friday every day of the week. Some organizations allow for a liberal interpretation of the company dress code, so it is important to follow the preference of your management, not your co-workers.

Volunteers Wanted, Now!

By Rowe Leathers
Contributor, Career Services

Volunteer opportunities are all around us. If you are seeking ways to fill your time and build your resume, consider volunteering. Providing a helping hand, while gaining experience, is a great way to build your own worth, both personally and professionally.

30 is the New 30

By Shun McGhee
Contributor, Career Services

Can you imagine what it would look like, if 30 year-old students made decisions like they did when they were 20? What if a large number of 30 year olds filled the cafeteria dying to know who was going to this weekend’s pajama jammy jam (that’s a co-ed pajama party)? While I could make an infinite list of things 30 year-old college students should not be doing, I will instead set my sights on the things they should be doing.

Gain New Experience Without Giving Up Your Day Job

By Cathy Francois
Contributor, Career Services

If you are transitioning into a new career, gaining initial experience can be a difficult feat. It’s far too easy to say, “Oh, just get an internship.” For many, however, particularly those with family responsibilities or who wish to maintain a certain standard of living, a full-time internship may not always be the answer. Here are some alternate ways to gain resume-worthy experience while keeping your day job.

“Jack” of All Trades, Master of One

By Shun McGhee
Contributor, Career Services

While it is good to know how to do many things well, there should be some subject matter you have learned or craft you have perfected, of which you could be considered a master.

Can a Person Change Their Stars? The Role Social Inheritance Plays in Your Ability to Succeed

By Shun McGhee
Contributor, Career Services

The other day I was having a conversation with two friends of mine regarding our life goals and career journeys. To my surprise, my ambitions were met with some opposition. One of my friends began explaining to me how we were “common folk,” and the people who have achieved dreams like those I outlined, came from affluent backgrounds or heritages that helped make success more attainable. While perhaps my friend was right, my question to him was, “Can a person change his or her stars?” While we both agreed that a person could change their stars, how does one do that?

You’re Not Fooling Anyone: A Lesson in Resume Writing

By Cathy Francois
Contributor, Career Services

Besides spell checking and proofreading to eliminate errors, be sure to supply evidence or examples in your resume to back up the skills or attributes you claim to have. It’s not enough to just state that you’re an “organized, committed, hard-working employee with effective communications skills” if the reader can’t see it in action. Provide examples that bring your resume to life.

The Art of Career Fair Follow Up

By Courtney Bousquet
Contributor, Career Services

You’ve dressed to impress, schmoozed with recruiters, and acquired some great leads after attending a career fair, now what? The answer is simple: follow up, follow up, follow up! Your work doesn’t stop just because the event has ended; in fact it’s just beginning. Follow these three simple tips to make the most of your career fair connections.

Career Fairs: A Job Seeker's Blind Date (Part II)

By Christine Muncy
Contributor, Career Services

It’s not easy attending an event, the sole purpose of which is having several people (recruiters, specifically) remember you, when you do not know anyone there. Leaving an event with the confidence that you gave it your best is the most we can hope for. But you shouldn’t go ill prepared: read the earlier post from this week about the steps you should take before you get to the next steps, listed below. Following this list from start to finish should give you positive results, and hopefully take you from ‘just another face’ to the one recruiters remember (for a good reason).